About Our Animals


Click links below to learn more about the Miniatures and Rare Breeds raised at Tanglewood Farm.


Showing all 24 results

About Chincoteague Pony

The Chincoteague Pony, or Assateague horse, is a breed of pony originating from the Assateague Island off the coast of Virginia and Maryland. Left by settlers in the 17th century, the ponies were exposed to harsh conditions and a poor diet of salt marsh plants and brush. Over time, the breed became small in stature and thrifty. Local farmers occasionally released new horses on the island to diversify the genetics and dilute inbreeding beginning in the early 20th century.

Read More

About Crevecoeur Chickens

The Crevecoeur chicken is the oldest of the standard-bred fowls of France, having been documented since 1700, although many believe it has existed much longer. The breed originated in a small town in Normandy, France, Crève-Coeur en Ange. The breed’s name translates as “broken heart,” as in the romantic sense. Little else is known of the breed’s origins other than its origin in Normandy and its long history in the region.

Crevecoeur chickens are a solid black colored with males having an iridescent quality to their tail feathers. they are a compact bird with well-proportioned bodies and short blue-grey legs. The most notable feature about the Crevecoeur is their solid black crests and beards. They are quiet and deliberate in movement, and are moderately shy in nature.

Read More

About Estrela Mountain Dogs

Estrela Mountain Dogs are in the working group called Livestock Guardian Dogs (LGDs). Unlike herding breeds, LGD do not herd or move their charges around. A LGD job is to carefully watch their flock to make sure they are safe from predators. Much of their time is spent sitting, watching the herd with occasional spurts of energy to investigate potential dangers.

Read More

About Giant Flemish Rabbits

Flemish Giant rabbits are a domestic breed of rabbit raised for meat that originated from the Flanders region of Belgium. It has been known to be bred as early as the 16th century in Ghent, Belgium. However, a breed standard wasn’t established until 1893. The Flemish Giant was first imported into America in the early 1890’s, but received little attention until 1910 when it appeared at small livestock shows throughout the country.

Read More

About Indian Runner Ducks

Runner type ducks have existed in Indo-China for over 2000 years, evidenced by ancient Japanese temple carvings. People in this area commonly herd ducks; During the day the ducks roam rice fields, feeding off of weeds, snails, insects, and small reptiles. At night, they return to a bamboo or clay enclosure. Herders collect the eggs each morning before taking their flock into the fields.

Over the years, ducks that were able to walk long distances, forage well, and were prolific layers were selected for breeding. These Runner ducks were introduced into the United Kingdom by Malayan ship captains around 1850. Their ability to produce plentiful clutches of eggs and unique look made them popular among poultry enthusiasts.

Read More

About Langshan Chickens

Langshan chickens, sometimes referred to as Croad Langshans, originated in the Langshan district around the Yangtszekiang River near Shanghai. Major A.C. Croad of England first imported this unique breed in 1872. The Langshan was bred throughout the Langshan region to survive the damp conditions.

Read More

About Miniature African Pygmy Goats

Miniature Goats are very affectionate and love to be talked to, rubbed and brushed. They are very intelligent and easily learn to walk on a leash, can be housebroken, and can be taught tricks. Miniature Goats require little feed, can be kept in a small yard and do not require fancy housing. They make wonderful pets and are great lawn mowers and weed eaters!

Miniature Goats are members of the Caprine family. They are ruminants which means they are cud-chewing animals. Ruminants have four-chambered stomachs. The language of goats is called “bleating”. Male goats are called billies or bucks. Female goats are called nannies or does. Baby goats are called kids. It takes a female goat five months to have a baby. Miniature Goats have babies twice a year. Most nanny goats have twins, sometimes triplets. Baby goats are weaned at two months of age. Miniature Goats live up to 15 years.

Read More

About Miniature Babydoll Southdown Sheep

Miniature Sheep are ruminants and have four-chambered stomachs. They are cud-chewing animals. Male sheep are called rams. Female sheep are called ewes. Miniature Sheep mate from August to December. It takes a female sheep five months to have a baby lamb. Miniature Sheep give birth only one time a year, usually in the spring. They often have twins and occasionally triplets. The baby lambs are usually weaned between eight to twelve weeks old.

Miniature Sheep live 15 to 16 years and make wonderful pets. They are quiet and gentle. They love weeds, honeysuckle and kudzu. Miniature Sheep help farmers clean ground in vineyards, high bush fruit fields, and small orchards. They are small enough not to damage the fruit and do not eat the bark off trees. They keep down weeds, insects, and leave behind all that fertilizer!

Read More

About Miniature Bison

The American Bison, a symbol of the Wild West, roamed much of North America at one time. Their traditional range spread from the Great Bear Lake in Canada’s northwest, south to Durango and Nuevo Leon in Mexico, and stretched as far east as New York and Georgia. Native Americans living on the plains would travel with the Bison herds to provide their families with a continuous supply of food. In addition to consuming the meat, they would use their hides, fiber, and even bones and sinew to make clothing and tools. Settlers moving through the West over-hunted the Bison, often taking only choice pieces of meat and leaving the remainder. By the 1900’s, fewer than 500 wild Bison existed.

Read More

About Miniature Donkeys

Miniature donkeys are native to the Mediterranean islands of Sicily and Sardinia. They make great pets for children and adults. They are very easy to train to pull a cart or carry a small child. They are quite intelligent, curious, and very affectionate.

Miniature donkeys weigh between 250 and 450 pounds. Their height limit at maturity is 36 inches at the withers which is the last hair of the mane at the bottom of the neck.

Read More

About Miniature Horses

Miniature horses are always referred to as “horses”, not ponies, because of their proportions, character and size. They are smaller than pony breeds.

One of the myths of the miniature horse is that they are a throwback to Eohippus of the Eocene epoch which were only 10 to 20 inches tall. These Eohippus lived about 50 million years ago, both in North America and Europe. Another myth was that these little horses were found stranded in some box canyon where years of short rations had reduced them to today’s size.

Read More

About Miniature Jack Russell Terriers

The Jack Russell Terrier breed was founded in the mid-1800’s in Devonshire, England by a clergyman named Parson John (Jack) Russell. Like many of his countrymen, the Reverend Russell had a passion for fox hunting.

The Jack Russell Terrier was originally bred not to kill the fox, but to cause it to run from any hiding place so that the fox hunt could continue. The Jack Russell Terrier is now more popular than ever as a lively, intelligent companion and a familiar sight around horse stables.

Read More

About Miniature Jersey Cows

Tanglewood Farm raises Miniature Jersey Cows from the original Ralph Martin Jersey stock which are descendants of the original “Old Man Snow” Jersey’s imported from the Jersey Islands and have been kept in their original pure form by Ralph Martin. Miniature Jerseys are one of the rarest breeds of cows.

Miniature cattle at three years of age and over should not exceed 700 pounds live weight. They must be under 42 inches at the hip to be classified as miniature. Compare this to the standard mature cow which weighs 1000 to 2000 pounds and is 50 to 60 inches tall.

Read More

About Miniature Llamas/Alpacas

The domestic Llama and the Alpaca were developed through thousands of years of controlled breeding by the Incas. They played an integral part in the Inca civilization which dwelled on the high Andean plateau and the mountains of South America.  They used Llamas as pack animals as well as for their meat, hide and sinew; the Alpacas were bred for their fine fiber.

Read More

About Miniature Manx Cats

The Manx Cat originated on the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea between Scotland and Ireland. They are an old breed with many fables about their origins dating back two to three hundred years ago. The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) has recognized this breed since the 1920’s.

Read More

About Miniature Nigerian Dwarf Goats

Miniature Goats are very affectionate and love to be talked to, rubbed and brushed. They are very intelligent and easily learn to walk on a leash, can be housebroken, and can be taught tricks. Miniature Goats require little feed, can be kept in a small yard and do not require fancy housing. They make wonderful pets and are great lawn mowers and weed eaters!

Miniature Goats are members of the Caprine family. They are ruminants which means they are cud-chewing animals. Ruminants have four-chambered stomachs. The language of goats is called “bleating”. Male goats are called billies or bucks. Female goats are called nannies or does. Baby goats are called kids. It takes a female goat five months to have a baby. Miniature Goats have babies twice a year. Most nanny goats have twins, sometimes triplets. Baby goats are weaned at two months of age. Miniature Goats live up to 15 years.

Read More

About Miniature Potbellied Pigs

Miniature Pigs are sometimes falsely marketed as micro pigs, pocket pigs, or teacup pigs. In the middle 1980’s, Keith Connell imported the first Miniature Vietnamese Potbellied Pigs from Southeast Asia. Miniature pigs belong to the porcine family. As pets, they grow to be 10 to 15 inches tall. Their length should be in proportion to height. The average weight is 25 to 55 pounds. The usual color is all black. Other rare colors include all white or black and white pintos with blue eyes. Miniature Potbellied Pigs have a sway back and a straight tail. Male pigs are called boars. Female pigs are called sows.

Read More

About Miniature Shetland Sheep

Miniature Sheep are ruminants and have four-chambered stomachs. They are cud-chewing animals. Male sheep are called rams. Female sheep are called ewes. Miniature Sheep mate from August to December. It takes a female sheep five months to have a baby lamb. Miniature Sheep give birth only one time a year, usually in the spring. They often have twins and occasionally triplets. The baby lambs are usually weaned between eight to twelve weeks old.

Miniature Sheep live 15 to 16 years and make wonderful pets. They are quiet and gentle. They love weeds, honeysuckle and kudzu. Miniature Sheep help farmers clean ground in vineyards, high bush fruit fields, and small orchards. They are small enough not to damage the fruit and do not eat the bark off trees. They keep down weeds, insects, and leave behind all that fertilizer!

Read More

About Miniature Yaks

Yaks are a member of the bovine family originating from the Himalaya region of south Central Asia and the Tibetan Plateau. They are related to domestic cattle, but their closest relative is the American bison. The yak was domesticated from the wild yak thousands of years ago. Since the 1990’s, conservation efforts have been taken to help preserve the wild yak population. There are fewer than 300 wild yaks today.

Read More

About Narragansett Turkey

The Narragansett turkey is named for Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island, where the variety was developed. It is the descendent of a cross between wild turkeys and domesticated breeds brought by settlers from colonists in the 1600’s, likely Norfolk Blacks. Selectively bred to improve and standardize the breed, the Narragansett was the foundation of the turkey industry in the New England states, being especially popular in Rhode Island and Connecticut. The American Poultry Association recognized the Narragansett in 1874.

Read More

About San Clemente Island Goats

San Clemente Island goats are a feral breed of goats that are small, deer-like, and have kind and gentle dispositions. The standard color is a black-and-brown buckskin patter, but darker shades of mahogany, black, cream, rose also occur. Some SCI goats may have white patches, and even more rare are pure white SCI goats. SCI goats are great multi-purpose goats and have been used for both milk and meat. As milk goats, they can produce up to 2 liters of milk at 6-7% butterfat per day.

Read More